New Privacy Rights

What are the New Privacy Rights of Data Subjects?

Under the GDPR some of the privacy rights of data subjects will remain the same as those outlined in the Data Protection Act (1998). However, there will also be some significant changes. In order to make the transition to GDPR compliance as smooth as possible, it is important that organisations familiarise themselves with all the relevant privacy rights.

The Right to be Informed

The Right to be Informed

Data subjects should be informed of different information at different stages of their data being processed. The information supplied will also depend on where you obtained the personal data from. 

The Right to Rectification

Data subjects have the right to rectify their data if it is incorrect or incomplete. If the data has been disclosed to others, all recipients should be notified of the changes. A request for rectification should be responded to within one month unless more complex circumstances are involved.

The Right to Rectification
The Right to Erasure

The Right to Erasure

This is more commonly known as ‘the right to be forgotten’.  Individuals have the right to have personal data erased, and prevent the processing of it in certain situations, including when it is no longer necessary when the individual withdraws consent, or if the data was unlawfully processed.

The Right to Restrict Processing

Subjects have the right to prevent any further processing of their personal data. When this right is exercised, the organisation storing the data may continue to do so but are not permitted to process it.

The Right to Restrict Processing
The Right to Data Portability

The Right to Data Portability

Data subjects have the right to obtain their information for their own purposes, without hindering its usability.

The Right to Object

There are a number of things that data subjects have the right to object to processing based on legitimate interests or performance of a task in the public interest, profiling, and processing for purposes of scientific or historical research.

The Right to Object
The Right to Access

The Right to Access

This not only allows the subject to access their data but also to verify the lawfulness of the processing of their data. They also have the right to access information that is supplementary to their personal data. It is important to note that access must be granted free of charge.

Do you need more information about how you can get ready for the GDPR? Arden Group has teamed up with Microsoft and Mimecast to bring you a complimentary GDPR Seminar in Birmingham. Click here to find out more information and book your place.

Got a Question?

We wish to emphasise that Arden Group is a Managed Service Provider and not a legal firm. That means that the views brought forward in this page are not necessarily shared by lawyers or courts.

Arden Group, therefore, does not guarantee that all information is factual and interpreted correctly. If you wish to ensure your advice or your company is legally covered by GDPR, consider consulting legal or specialised advice.

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